• To shuck or not to shuck.

    From Lodinsetki@VERT/REALITY to Nopants on Fri Jan 19 08:30:11 2024
    Re: To shuck or not to shuck.
    By: Nopants to Digital Man on Mon Dec 04 2023 12:10 pm

    Agree with last statement, also depends what sotrage for,
    games of newer, can be better on SSD, some even good USB STICK.
    but a good quilty spin drive. works great, have had few SSD die.
    but the old spinner still spins. :)
    but some games needing faster respounse, can play better on SSD.
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  • From Lodinsetki@VERT/REALITY to Digital Man on Fri Jan 19 08:38:40 2024
    Re: To shuck or not to shuck.
    By: Nopants to Digital Man on Mon Dec 04 2023 12:10 pm

    Agree with last staement, but depending what storage used for.
    depending on game, SSD can be better, or even a good USB stick.
    but a GOOD quality Spinner has done me good.
    {have had Many SSD die} But the spinner still spins.
    Reason for some games, (newer mainly) is due to tranfer speed.
    high pace shooter something like that takes high laod, and reponse need. Moderatio Est Figmentum
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  • From Nopants@VERT/CITBBS to Lodinsetki on Sat Jan 20 09:22:00 2024
    Re: To shuck or not to shuck.
    By: Lodinsetki to Digital Man on Fri Jan 19 2024 08:38 am

    {have had Many SSD die} But the spinner still spins.

    I've had really good luck with SSDs. The one I killed was holding virtual machines, so likely very high i/o. But, it did take awhile. SSDs I have used for storage have been good to me. Like you say, it depends on the use case.


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  • From Weatherman@VERT/TLCBBS to Nopants on Sat Jan 27 02:14:00 2024
    Nopants wrote to Lodinsetki <=-

    Re: To shuck or not to shuck.
    By: Lodinsetki to Digital Man on Fri Jan 19 2024 08:38 am

    {have had Many SSD die} But the spinner still spins.

    I've had really good luck with SSDs. The one I killed was holding
    virtual machines, so likely very high i/o. But, it did take awhile.
    SSDs I have used for storage have been good to me. Like you say, it depends on the use case.

    SSDs are great for OS drives but any use scenario with heavy I/O operations will eventually hit the write/rewrite limit on SSD cells. In my work environment OS drives are SSDs and storage drives are spinning drives. I think as we move more toward more energy efficiency we'll see SSDs used as storage devices more often. With SLC drives now capable of up to 1,000,000 rewrites to each cell the reliability of SSDs is getting closer to that of platter drives. Long gone are the days of staged ESDI startup sequences where you can hear each drive individually start spinning and see the BIOS advise you as to which drive has reached operational RPMs.....



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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Weatherman on Sat Jan 27 15:57:15 2024
    Re: To shuck or not to shuck.
    By: Weatherman to Nopants on Sat Jan 27 2024 02:14 am

    SSDs are great for OS drives but any use scenario with heavy I/O operations will eventually hit the write/rewrite limit on SSD cells. In my work environment OS drives are SSDs and storage drives are spinning drives.

    Doesn't an OS write to its drive quite a lot? I thought modern OSes typically write quite a bit in log files, swap files (if necessary), etc.. I would have thought an OS drive would get more I/O usage than a drive used for storage.

    Nightfox

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  • From fusion@VERT/CFBBS to Nightfox on Sun Jan 28 01:20:00 2024
    On 27 Jan 2024, Nightfox said the following...

    SSDs are great for OS drives but any use scenario with heavy I/O operations will eventually hit the write/rewrite limit on SSD cells. my work environment OS drives are SSDs and storage drives are spinnin drives.

    Doesn't an OS write to its drive quite a lot? I thought modern OSes typically write quite a bit in log files, swap files (if necessary),
    etc.. I would have thought an OS drive would get more I/O usage than a drive used for storage.

    both the OS and the device are aware of disk wear nowadays. last i checked my drive's SMART data, it was fairly low to the point of being uninteresting.. having had the drives for quite a long time.

    most VPS come with SSD storage nowadays and people abuse the heck out of those without causing problems :)

    this might not apply to the cheapest unreputable stuff though.

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  • From Weatherman@VERT/TLCBBS to Nightfox on Mon Feb 5 01:47:00 2024
    Nightfox wrote to Weatherman <=-

    Re: To shuck or not to shuck.
    By: Weatherman to Nopants on Sat Jan 27 2024 02:14 am

    SSDs are great for OS drives but any use scenario with heavy I/O operations will eventually hit the write/rewrite limit on SSD cells. In my work environment OS drives are SSDs and storage drives are spinning drives.

    Doesn't an OS write to its drive quite a lot? I thought modern OSes typically write quite a bit in log files, swap files (if necessary),
    etc.. I would have thought an OS drive would get more I/O usage than a drive used for storage.

    Nightfox

    In general you are correct, however in the environment I work in the storage drives see up to several million write/rewrite operations a day. Beyond that, we're looking at arrays with as few as 12 storage disks per node and as many as 60 with up to 16 nodes per rack. With the difference between SSD and spinning drive costs, it adds up pretty quick when you look at the difference in cost per terabyte. Spinning drives are just cheaper, especially when you're looking at petabytes per rack. It's just a lot cheaper to install a 960 GB SSD for OS, another 480 GB SSD for read cache and then fill up the storage slots with as many 8, 10, or 12 TB spinning drives as the customer specifies.

    We DO have a model that is all SSD and it's the latest and greatest so it may indicate the direction in which the product is going, but to tell the truth, that model faces several operational challenges that the spinning drives do not.

    Anyway, all that is designed by people who are supposedly a lot smarter than me (at least they get paid like they are). All I do is try to keep the damned things running when the system admins are barely capable of putting their shoes on the right feet in the morning.



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